Geopolitik Energi

May 10, 2007

ALL ABOUT OIL IN SOMALIA!

Just click links below:

Stratigraphy and Petroleum Prospects of Northern Somalia

The Oil Factor in Somalia

Oil Hopes Hinge on North Somalia

Somaliland: Hopes and hype on the new frontier

Hydrocarbon potential of Somaliland (download file PDF)

Advertisements

April 27, 2007

HYDROCARBON POTENTIAL OF SOMALILAND

“The available well, seismic, and outcrop data show that the
potential for commercial accumulations of hydrocarbons in
Somaliland is good….”

DOWNLOAD FILE:

Hydrocarbon potential of Somaliland (download file PDF)

Artikel lain yang terkait (klik aja):

April 25, 2007

SOMALILAND: HOPES AND HYPE ON THE FRONTIER

Copyright (c) 1993 , EMA Business Information.
Reprinted by permission.

Middle East Economic Digest, 2 April 1993, pp.20-21.

Somaliland: Hopes and hype on the new frontier

MARIA KIELMAS

Geologists have speculating about the possibility of oil in Somalia since the last century, but it took the US military Operation Restore Hope to bring this possibility to popular attention. The widespread notion that US troops are sent to Somalia to protect the interests of US oil companies, and their supposed huge oil finds, has been treated with amused derision in oil industry circles. But US military presence which aims to stabilise events in a region increasingly regarded as the backyard of its regional ally, Saudi Arabia, has not been discounted . Over the past l0 years most of the oil industry interest has focused on areas in the north, today the self-declared Republic of Somaliland, which troops have avoided. Any future oil exploration here will depend largely on the international community's recognition of the aspirations of the breakaway state.

Oil seeps were first identified by Italian and British geologists who surveyed the area during the colonial era. These predicted the presence of a sizable oil field just south of Berbera. But it took until the 1960s for the first wells to be drilled here. Three wells known as the Daga Shabell series, regisrered oil shows, but there was no real discovery . There were further small gas discoveries along the east coast and just offshore of Socotra, but nothing of commercial proportions.

STRATIGRAPHY AND PETROLEUM PROSPECT OF NORTHERN SOMALIA

Stratigraphy and Petroleum Prospects of Northern Somalia

SALAD HERSI, O., Quebec Geoscience Center, Ste-Foy, QC; and HILOWLE MOHAMED, A., Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON

The sedimentary cover of Northern Somalia includes post-Triassic continental and marine strata which accumulated in basins related to the disintegration of the Gondwanaland. Among these, the Berbera and Ahl Mado basins are the most important basins stratigraphically and hydrocarbon potential. Sedimentation in both basins begins with a Jurassic continental sandstone (Adigrat Formation) overlain by interbedded units of shallow marine limestones and shales (Bihendula sequence) in the Berbera Basin, and limestone-dominated strata with minor shale and sandstone interbeds (Ahl Mado Group) in the Ahl Mado Basin. The Cretaceous section, unconformable with the Jurassic sequence, is mainly continental (Yesomma Sandstone) in the Berbera Basin, but becomes shallow-marine, sandy to pure limestone with subordinate sandstone and shale (Tisje Formation) in the Ahl Mado Basin. By the end of the Cretaceous Period, a westward marine transgression permitted shallow-marine, Paleocene – lower Eocene limestone (Auradu Formation) deposition throughout northern Somalia. This is succeeded by thick anhydrite strata (Taleh Formation) overlain by Middle to Late Eocene shallow-marine limestone (Karkar Formation). The later is the youngest stratigraphic unit straddling the Gulf of Aden. Younger strata of syn- and post-rifting, continental to shallow-marine origin are confined in discrete basins along the coast of the gulf.

Based on published and unpublished data, the geology of these basins proves that oil and gas have been generated with favorable reservoirs, as well as structural and stratigraphic traps. Moreover, continuation of these basins across the gulf, matching the hydrocarbon-producing Marib-Hajar and Say’un-Al Masila basins of Yemen, raises the hydrocarbon prospect of northern Somalia.

ABSTRACTS – ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN PETROLEUM GEOLOGISTS (AAPG) EASTERN SECTION 2000 MEETING

http://www.ogsrlibrary.com/aapg/abstracts.htm

Artikel lain yang terkait (klik aja):

OIL HOPES HINGE ON NORTH SOMALIA

Copyright Petroleum Economist Ltd. (UK) 1991.
Petroleum Economist. Vol 58, Issue n10, Oct, 1991, p19(2).

Oil Hopes Hinge on North Somalia

Maria Kielmas

A UN-funded study points to oil potential in Ethiopia and Somalia. Maria Kielmas talked to emerging rulers in the region about their oil policies.

Wars in countries comprising the Horn of Africa put on hold the first real spark of international industry interest in the region's oil prospects. As a variety of political factions wrestle for control in Ethiopia and Somalia, only one group, the Somali National Movement (SNM), which controls the self-proclaimed Republic of Somaliland in northern Somalia, has maintained a positive policy towards foreign oil investment.

Aside from the political conflict, oil exploration in the African Horn has generally been neglected because of a widespread perception throughout the industry that the region is gas-prone and both inaccessible and expensive to explore. The countries around the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea are regarded as too poor to afford the necessary infrastructure for gas development.

THE OIL FACTOR IN SOMALIA

http://www.raceandhistory.com/cgi-bin/forum/webbbs_config.pl/noframes/read/15

US interests in Somalia

Copyright 1993 The Times Mirror Company


Los Angeles Times

January 18, 1993

THE OIL FACTOR IN SOMALIA

FOUR AMERICAN PETROLEUM GIANTS HAD AGREEMENTS WITH THE AFRICAN NATION BEFORE ITS CIVIL WAR BEGAN. THEY COULD REAP BIG REWARDS IF PEACE IS RESTORED

By MARK FINEMAN


DATELINE: MOGADISHU, Somalia

Far beneath the surface of the tragic drama of Somalia, four major U.S. oil companies are quietly sitting on a prospective fortune in exclusive concessions to explore and exploit tens of millions of acres of the Somali countryside.

That land, in the opinion of geologists and industry sources, could yield significant amounts of oil and natural gas if the U.S.-led military mission can restore peace to the impoverished East African nation.

According to documents obtained by The Times, nearly two-thirds of Somalia was allocated to the American oil giants Conoco, Amoco, Chevron and Phillips in the final years before Somalia’s pro-U.S. President Mohamed Siad Barre was overthrown and the nation plunged into chaos in January, 1991. Industry sources said the companies holding the rights to the most promising concessions are hoping that the Bush Administration’s decision to send U.S. troops to safeguard aid shipments to Somalia will also help protect their multimillion-dollar investments there.

April 11, 2007

OIL, THE ONLY US INTEREST IN AFRICA

http://www.granma.cu/INGLES/2005/julio/juev7/28petro.html

Havana. July 7, 2005

Oil, the only US interest in Africa

BY JOAQUIN ORAMAS

THE discovery of oil in Africa would seem to have begun to reinsert the continent into the dynamics of world trade and has resuscitated considerable interest on the part of the US government. In the autumn of 2002, the British magazine The Economist made an accusation to that effect that was echoed by officials and researchers.

In an interview for Asia Times Online published in the fall of 2003, US security analyst Michael Klare, the author of Resource Wars, warned of Washington’s potential implication on the African continent. When asked where the next oil conflict after Iraq could emerge, Klare responded, “I think inAfrica, the situation there is heating up.”

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.